Sketching in Bangalore: Commercial Street

•July 17, 2012 • 7 Comments

These are sketches from another whole day of sketching in Bangalore. We sketched along Commercial Street, where the crowds and shops and traffic provided plenty of material. There was so much dust everywhere, it was extraordinary. Our clothes and sketchbooks were coated with it. All sorts of people came to watch us as we sketched. One man was extremely eager that we draw a portrait of him, but we managed to deflect his demands. 🙂
Mohini:

Mallika:

Then we drew a flower shop by the roadside. It was in front of a dingy, dusty, drippy building, and the bright flowers contrasted with the dark, stained walls.
Mallika:

Mohini:

On the way home, we stopped at fourth block market, and sketched some fruit vendors.
Mohini:

I also sketched a man reading a paper. He appeared to be in the recycling business, buying old paper and bottles from people to sell to recycling plants. He sat beside a big, red, old-fashioned scale and in front of a doorway. The little wall niche above him in the sketch is traditionally a place to put an oil lamp.

Meanwhile, Mallika did a sketch of a mechanic’s shop. The poster on the building is of Rajnikanth, a very famous South Indian actor.
Mallika:

Sketching in Bangalore (Mohini)

•July 17, 2012 • 2 Comments

These are sketches from a whole day of sketching with a friend in Bangalore. We went to some old areas of the city. I was very happy because I got to sketch people: my favorite sketching subjects.
The first sketch is of a pavilion in Cubbon Park, an enormous garden. The pavilion is a pretty and delicate structure, unfortunately in very bad condition.

Afterwards, I did a sketch of the Central Library, also in Cubbon Park. It was built by the British, and has been painted a wonderful brick red.

Later, I did several sketches of street vendors.


Sketching in Coonoor

•July 17, 2012 • 1 Comment

We took another trip recently to Coonoor, a picturesque hill station in the Nilgiris. The weather was wonderful and the scenery idyllic: perfect for sketching.
The first two sketches are of All Saints Church, built during the British era and surrounded by the graves of many Englishmen, women, and even young children.
Mallika:

Mohini:

We also sketched near a village rapidly transforming itself into a town. Though the sketch looks pretty, such towns often blight the pristine hills. Near where we sketched, there was an enormous pile of garbage, the stench of which spoiled the otherwise fresh air.
Mallika drew the town, while I drew a nearby Hindu shrine.
Mallika:

Mohini:

Mallika also sketched the Coonoor Club, which is another quaint British-era building. It is set amidst a lovely garden, and covered in flowering creepers.

Finally, here is Mallika’s sketch of a village market in Tamil Nadu. We stopped there on the way to Coonoor. It was sweltering in comparison to the cool weather of the hills.

Sketching in UC Berkeley

•July 17, 2012 • Leave a Comment

While in California, we went sketching on the UC Berkeley campus. They were in the process of demolishing a building, and it was an intriguingly ugly sight.
Mohini:

Sketching in San Francisco

•June 29, 2012 • 1 Comment

Mohini:
While in California, I went sketching to San Francisco with my aunt. We went to see the painted ladies: an iconic group of houses that appear often on postcards from the city. 🙂 I did not draw the painted ladies themselves, but some equally lovely and ornate homes nearby. The originals are much less muddy looking than those in my sketch but my paint box was not properly cleaned when I began.

Sketching in the Mission District, San Francisco

•June 29, 2012 • Leave a Comment

We are tragically behind in our posting. These sketches are from our trip to California in August. We spent a day in San Francisco’s Mission District, which is a bright and lively place to sketch.
Mohini:

Mallika:

Sketching in Bangalore: St. Mark’s Road

•June 13, 2012 • 4 Comments

These sketches are of two old buildings on St. Mark’s Road in Bangalore. They were built during the colonial era, and still have their original stone signs up, even though the establishments within them have changed. In their brown stone, they look graceful and enduring amidst the traffic and bustle.
Mallika:

Mohini: